Germany: Oktoberfest, Beer Tasting, Castles & Surfing

Having already visited Germany a couple of times, I was really excited to head back to visit Munich and Nuremberg; two cities I hadn’t explored yet. Our main reason for visiting at the end of September was of course, Oktoberfest, the world’s largest beer festival (known as Volkfest).

Oktoberfest

A few of my friends I was travelling with had been to Oktoberfest before, but the closest I’d ever come to it was dancing on a table in Sheffield’s Bierkeller with a stein, so I was very excited to finally experience the real deal!

The main Oktoberfest festival site is in the centre of Munich, and it’s definitely worth going to if you want the full Oktoberfest experience. With several beer halls to choose from, food stalls and fairground rides, it’s easy to spend all day there. On the weekend days, you have to arrive pretty earlier to bag yourself a table (some people spend lots of money reserving them too, but we were happy to just turn up and join someone else’s table). The festival itself shuts about 10pm each night too, so it’s definitely worth getting up early and making a day of it.

Walking into the first big beer hall was certainly a sight to behold as I hadn’t envisioned quite how many people they could fit; in total, there were around 6,000 people! Inside there are rows of benches, a Bavarian band and thousands of steins clinking together. The best part of these halls is how sociable they are, as you join other people on the benches. We met people from all over the world, and it’s the best atmosphere getting to celebrate together. The highlight of this for me is the tradition of someone having to down their stein if they stand up on the table. While they do this, everyone hurls food at them and chants. I felt like I was stood watching a medieval play or something seeing radishes fly threw the air!

Outfits are another huge part of Oktoberfest, and I was glad we’d purchased lederhosen and dirndls in advance. We bought these for quite cheap online, but many of the locals had beautiful, traditional versions which were certainly something to show off.

My favourite hall inside Oktoberfest had to be Hacker, as the beer is particularly tasty and the rowdy atmosphere was perfect for my friend’s birthday. And yes, he had to down his stein on the table!

Munich

As Saturday was looking to be the busiest day for Oktoberfest, we decided to head explore the centre of Munich for the day. The architecture in Munich is absolutely stunning, and even though a lot of attractions were closed during the festival, it was still enjoyable to explore the city. We visited the Oktoberfest Museum to find out more about the history of Munich’s breweries, before taking part in a beer tasting in the museum’s cellar of all the festival’s featured beers.

If you want to get a good view of the city, the Englischer Garten is a must. The garden itself is huge with a beautiful lake,  a Chinese Tower and a viewing stand on top of the hill. We enjoyed some great street food, steins and Bavarian music in the garden’s marketplace, before heading to the surfing wave. Known as the Eisbach, this river in Munich features a man-made wave which permanently flows throughout Munich. This spot is popular all year round with surfers practising their moves,  and tourists watching in awe.

While I got a great feel for the city, I’m keen to head back to Munich outside of Oktoberfest to explore the museums and other tourist attractions.

Nuremberg

As we were flying back from Nuremberg, we opted to leave Munich on the Sunday morning and head straight to Nuremberg to explore the city. We had an Airbnb apartment booked for the Sunday night, much to our relief after four nights of camping!

Nuremberg felt wonderfully calm and peaceful after the bustle of Munich and Oktoberfest. Like Munich, the architecture is beautiful, and the city looks like a traditional Bavarian town. We walked along the castle walls, enjoying the stunning views of the city and the pretty gardens near the top of the castle. As it was a Sunday and renovation work was taking place, we couldn’t go all the way to the top of the castle, but the views were still great just the same.

We spent the rest of Sunday afternoon grabbing tasty food from Nuremberg’s food market and enjoying yet more steins in some of the bars and beer halls. The permanent beer halls in Munich and Nuremberg are still great options for drinking if you’re wanting a more chilled atmosphere than that of the main Oktoberfest site.

A must-see in Nuremberg has to be the Ehekarussell fountain, which features disturbing statues depicting the poem Bitter-Sweet Married Life by Hans Sachs.  It’s certainly not like anything you will have seen before!

Similarly to Munich, I would like to visit Nuremberg again to visit the numerous museums and cultural attractions it has to offer. All in all, it was fantastic to visit Germany again, although I I think I’ve had enough steins and pretzels  to last me a while!

Advertisements